Top 5 Market Segmentation Trends for 2020

Top 5 Market Segmentation Trends for 2020

Segmentation has been around since the early days of marketing. “One size doesn’t fit all” has become the mantra of brand communication. Marketers have been racking their brains to identify the best way to categorize their audiences – and while more options bring more complexity, going the extra mile certainly pays off. 

Companies across industries increasingly rely on highly personalized communication and ultra-specific targeting. And they have good reason to, as email marketers have found a 760% revenue increase in campaigns that were segmented. So, it’s only right to ask yourself, “Have I reached my segmentation potential yet?”

Even those who are true innovators at heart need to see how dynamically market segmentation changes. As we venture further into the future, there are constantly new factors at play, be it disruptive technologies, big data or the ever-growing consumer demands. Learning how to build your segmentation strategy around these factors is what defines the leaders of tomorrow – while the others are left behind. 

Here are the top five market segmentation trends for 2020 that will help your business stay ahead of the curve.

1. New ways to collect and process data

Data is the oil of our time, and that’s even truer of data on consumers and client preferences, which is considered critical or important by 94% of companies. New capabilities such as chatbots, forms, messengers, and website actions bring more inputs and thus more data altogether. As companies race to extract as much valuable information as they can,

VMware completes Pivotal acquisition – TechCrunch

VMware completes Pivotal acquisition – TechCrunch

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1. VMware completes $2.7 billion Pivotal acquisition

VMware is closing the year with a significant new weapon in its arsenal. (I restrained myself from using a “pivotal” pun here. You’re welcome.)

The acquisition — first announced in August — helps the company in its transformation from a pure virtual machine supplier into a cloud native vendor that can manage infrastructure wherever it lives. It fits alongside the acquisitions of Heptio and Bitnami, two other deals that closed this year.

2. Spotify to ‘pause’ running political ads, citing lack of proper review

The company told us that starting early next year, it will stop selling political ads: “At this point in time, we do not yet have the necessary level of robustness in our processes, systems and tools to responsibly validate and review this content.”

3. ‘The Mandalorian’ returns for Season 2 on Disney+ in fall 2020

The last episode of the first season of “The Mandalorian” went live on Disney+ on Friday, and showrunner Jon Favreau wasted very little time confirming when we can expect season two of the smash hit to land: next fall.

4. 2019 Africa Roundup: Jumia IPOs, China goes digital, Nigeria becomes fintech capital

The last 12 months served as a grande finale to 10 years that saw triple-digit increases in startup

While other tech giants fund housing initiatives, Amazon is opening a homeless shelter — inside its HQ – TechCrunch

While other tech giants fund housing initiatives, Amazon is opening a homeless shelter — inside its HQ – TechCrunch

As big tech gets bigger, industry leaders have begun making more noise about helping homeless populations, particularly in those regions where high salaries have driven up the cost of living to heights not seen before. Last January, for example, Facebook and the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, among other participants, formed a group called the Partnership for the Bay’s Future that said it was going to commit hundreds of millions of dollars to expand affordable housing and strengthen “low-income tenant protections” in the five main counties in and around San Francisco. Microsoft meanwhile made a similar pledge in January of last year, promising $500 million to increase housing options in Seattle where low- and middle-income workers are being priced out of the city and its surrounding suburbs.

Amazon has made similar pledges in the past, with CEO Jeff Bezos pledging $2 billion to combat homelessness and to fund a network of “Montessori-inspired preschools in underserved communities,” as he said in a statement posted on Twitter at the time, in September 2018.

Now, however, Amazon is taking an approach that immediately raises the bar for its rivals in tech: it’s opening up a space in its Seattle headquarters to a homeless shelter, one that’s expected to become the largest family shelter in the state of Washington.

Business Insider reported the news earlier today, and it says the space will be able to accommodate 275 people each night and that it will offer individual, private rooms for families who are allowed to bring

China Airlines to start Taipei-Cebu City flights on March 2020

China Airlines sets Taipei-Cebu flights by March 2020

China Airlines has confirmed that it will begin offering direct flights between Mactan Cebu International Airport and Taoyuan International Airport on March 29, 2020.

Taiwan’s national carrier will be starting the route with six direct flights to Cebu on that date. According to a press release from the company, the airline will be using Boeing 737-800 aircraft for the flight. Each of the aircraft will have eight business-class and 150 economy-class seats for passengers.

China Airlines to start Taipei-Cebu City flights on March 2020 photo by markus winkler via unsplash

The flight will be available every day except on Tuesdays. The Taipei-Cebu flight will arrive at the Mactan airport every 10:35 AM Philippine time. The Cebu-Taipei route will then leave by 11:35 AM.

China Airlines made the decision to start a direct service between Taipei and Cebu because of the increasing demand. Cebu has emerged as the second most popular destination in the Philippines among the Taiwanese. Taipei, on the other hand, is seeing an increase in Filipino visits because of the country’s visa-free policy for Filipinos.

Jiufen, a mountaintop which used to be a former gold mining town on the northeast coast of Taiwan, is one of the most popular day trips from Taipei
Jiufen, a mountaintop which used to be a former gold mining town on the northeast coast of Taiwan, is one of the most popular day trips from Taipei

With the addition of China Airlines to its partners, the Mactan Cebu International Airport will already be serving 29 international flights to Taipei every week. Philippine Air Asia, EVA Air, and Tigerair Taiwan also have direct

Jumia IPOs, China goes digital, Nigeria becomes fintech capital – TechCrunch

Jumia IPOs, China goes digital, Nigeria becomes fintech capital – TechCrunch

2019 brought more global attention to Africa’s tech scene than perhaps any previous year.

A high-profile IPO, visits by both Jacks (Ma and Dorsey) and big Chinese startup investment energized that.

The last 12 months served as a grande finale to 10 years that saw triple-digit increases in startup formation and VC on the continent.

Here’s an overview of the 2019 market events that captured attention and capped off a decade of rapid growth in African tech.

IPOs

The story of the year is the April IPO on the NYSE of Pan-African e-commerce company Jumia. This was the first listing of a VC-backed tech company operating in Africa on a major global exchange —  which brought its own unpredictability.

Founded in 2012, Jumia pioneered much of its infrastructure to sell goods to consumers online in Africa.

With Nigeria as its base market, the Rocket Internet-backed company created accompanying delivery and payments services and went on to expand online verticals into 14 African countries (though it recently exited a few). Jumia now sells everything from mobile phones to diapers, and offers online services such as food-delivery and classifieds.

Seven years after its operational launch, Jumia’s stock debut kicked off with fanfare in 2019, only to be followed by volatility.

The online retailer gained investor confidence out of the gate, more than doubling its $14.95 opening share price post-IPO.

That lasted until May, when Jumia’s stock came under attack from short-seller Andrew Left, whose firm Citron Research issued a report accusing