Technician Education Can Fuel Financial Success

It doesn’t take a college degree to understand that a four-year education may not be the end-all and be-all it once was, according to a new survey of U.S. high school students. With rising costs for higher education, and the way it equates to a career, more high school students say costs will be a “deciding factor in which college they attend or whether they end up going at all,” according to the Washington D.C.-based nonprofit College Savings Foundation.

The survey, which is in its 10th year, found that of the 500 students polled, this year saw the highest percentage (55 percent) say they are thinking about technical schools and career schools in the same way they look at traditional universities.

This is good news for technical schools (most notably transportation technology and repair), that to date have had trouble attracting students through their doors.

“There is more computer code in today’s cars than there was used to put a man on the moon,” says Jennifer Maher, chief executive officer of the TechForce Foundation, a nonprofit organization that supports students through their education into successful careers as professional technicians. “These are skilled, well-paying, technical jobs.”

To put this into perspective, according to Motor Authority, a Ford GT has more than 10 millon lines of code and the new Ford F150 pickup has more than 150 million lines of code. Compare that to the shuttle’s primary flight software, which contains approximately 400,000 lines of code, and it becomes easy to see …

Did You Know Your Eye Makeup Could Be Making You Sick?

Sponsored News – For a lot of women, eye makeup is an essential part of being properly dressed — just as important as a stylish outfit or nice shoes.

But while mascara and eyeliner can create different looks, from subtle to striking, they can also make you sick.

The problem: Eye makeup can be a breeding ground for bacteria. We all have a few microbes, like Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, living around our eyes. When eyeliner or mascara is applied, some of those bugs stick to the applicator and are carried back to the makeup container.

Eye products are supposed to contain preservatives to keep bacteria from growing. But some products don’t have enough. And over time, the preservative’s effectiveness declines. As a result, the bacteria on an eyeliner pencil or mascara applicator grow and multiply. Each time you apply makeup, you get bigger and bigger doses of bacteria — enough to cause serious infections.

“Every year, many women end up with eye infections from cosmetics,” warns the University of Rochester Medical Center. “In rare cases, women have been temporarily or permanently blinded by an eye cosmetic, according to the FDA.”

You can, however, prevent these problems and others with these simple tips:

* Don’t share makeup to avoid spreading bacteria.

* Replace your eye makeup regularly, at least every three to four months.

* Remove eye makeup at the end of every day.

* Practice good eyelid hygiene.

* Keep updated on the latest eyelid-eyelash hygiene clinical safety reports.

Christine …

How to Give Your 2016 Resolutions Staying Power

With any new year comes a clean slate and a chance to take on new goals. For many, resolutions revolve around healthy changes, but experts caution that resolve begins to waver at the end of January — which is why setting specific, realistic goals is proven to be more effective.

“When it comes to fitness resolutions, the focus should be on small steps,” said Tom Holland, exercise physiologist and Bowflex Fitness Advisor. “While having a big goal to work toward can be motivating, it’s important to have small, manageable goals that allow you to celebrate the milestones along your fitness journey.”

Here are three examples of lofty fitness resolutions — and how to break them down into achievable goals:

* “I want to run a marathon.” Training for a race takes months of commitment. Start with a 5K and work your way up to a 10K or half marathon, before deciding if you’re ready to complete the full 26.2 miles. To build endurance before you hit the pavement, consider an in-home cardio machine like the Bowflex TreadClimber TC200. This machine combines the motions of a treadmill, a stepper and an elliptical for a low-impact, total-body workout.

* “I want to look like a bodybuilder.” This route takes serious patience. Begin with smaller goals, such as gaining one pound of muscle per month. You can accomplish this by increasing the amount of weight and reps with each workout. The Bowflex SelectTech 560 Dumbbells condense 32 different weights down to two …

How One Furniture Manufacturer Goes ‘Beyond Sustainability’

It’s no surprise that more companies are paying attention to their impact on their environment. However, some stand out by going beyond reducing their carbon footprints, to cultivating socially conscious corporate cultures in which making a positive impact is as important as making a profit.

Humanscale, a leader in the design and manufacture of high-performance ergonomic office products, demonstrates how one company’s leadership can set the example.

When it comes to environmental impact, “‘less bad’ is not good enough,” says Humanscale’s founder and CEO, Bob King.

“We took a look at our manufacturing and operational activities to understand our key impacts: energy, water, emissions, resource depletion, wildlife preservation, social responsibility and healthy materials,” says King.

“In each area, we consider what it would take to go beyond sustainability to making a truly positive impact on the world around us. If a company can make a positive impact in all of these ways, it will be acting like a tree,” he explains.

“While trees aim to grow, they’re self-sustaining and they replenish the environment. If we want to live at peace with the planet, then our factories must be like trees, our companies like a forest.”

Humanscale is set to release its annual Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Report in time to coordinate with Earth Overshoot Day, the date calculated to mark when humans have depleted Earth’s resources beyond its ability to regenerate these resources within a given year.

Company achievements highlighted in the report include the use of solar energy for …

No Arms, No Legs, No Worries

One might not think that someone with no arms and no legs could swim, much less scuba dive, but with the help of one non-profit organization based in the Chicagoland area, children, veterans and people of all abilities around the world can benefit from zero gravity and scuba therapy.

The Downers Grove-based Diveheart Foundation has been serving individuals with everything from spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries to those on the autism spectrum and with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Since 2001, this 501 C3, volunteer-driven charity has done everything from helping to facilitate cutting-edge scuba therapy research with university medical centers around the country to launching a leading international adaptive scuba training program for scuba instructors, dive buddies and adaptive divers (Diveheart refers to people with disabilities as adaptive divers, not handicapped or disabled divers).

“It’s not about scuba diving,” according to Tinamarie Hernandez, Diveheart Executive Director.

“Diveheart’s ultimate goal is to take the unrealized human potential that exists with individuals with disabilities and create a paradigm shift in their lives,” she says.

“We take Chris in the wheelchair and help him or her become Chris the scuba diver. Now Chris is no longer defined by his or her disability,” she adds.

“Diveheart then helps direct them to activities like coral reef restoration, marine biology and oceanography, giving them focus, purpose and helping them to feel valued while they are learning to become good stewards of the environment.”

Diveheart’s free scuba experience programs reach from coast to coast in the …